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From the 1920s to today
NORTH SHORE TOPICS
RESIDENTS IN NORTH SHORE
BARCLAY Bob
BECKLEY Marj
BECKLEY Ray
BERRY Malcolm
BERRY Lila nee Evans
BERRY Norma nee Burns
BICKERTON Bill & Mary
BLISS Peter
BROWN Elizabeth nee Minns
BUTTERWORTH Isabell nee Lane
CULLEN Molly nee Timney
CUNNINGHAM
DAVIE Iain
DOYLE Peter
DREW
DUMBRELL David
ELINGS Mrs Willi
FLETT John
GIBBONS David
GREIG Jim
GUY Alan
HAIGH Stella
HAYES Nelly nee Monkivitch
IZATT George
JENNING Dale
KING Jon
KLAASSEN Pam nee Dean
LESZCZYNSKI Malcolm
LUKE Patty nee O'Brien
McDOWELL Marcus
MITCHELL Della nee Evans
MONKIVITCH Mr
MORGAN Mr
PARK George
PARSONS Flo
POWER Bryan
SMITH Miss F.L.
SMITH June
SPITTY Nellie
TIMNEY Jack
TOMKINS Marj nee Thompson
WILSON Alan and Shirley nee Lock
YOUNG Tom and Jean
SEYMOUR Robin nee Ward
CHAMBERS Cheryl nee Eriksen
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BIVIANO June nee Dean

June Biviano nee Dean

I was born on 23 Dec 1938 at Geelong and given the names June Patricia. I was the third child in the family of Cyril and Gladys Dean and after me my parents produced six more children. I remember growing up in the house off Sparks Road down near the beach. The Hillmans and Parkers were our neighbours.

When I started school at North Shore I walked across the paddocks with my brother Cyril and sisters and the Blisses, the Wildmans, June Smith, Evelyn Sherlock and Alan Robinson.

My best friends at North Shore State School were Shirley Hole, Irene Grant, Denise Wildman, Elizabeth Moodie, Gloria Phillips and Royden Mapleson.

My favourite subject was spelling and my favourite

teacher was Mrs Rumble. Another teacher was Mrs Barker who lived next door to the home of my future husband Brian in Catherine Street, West Geelong. Mr Carroll was our Head Teacher.

At recess and lunch times our favourite games were skipping and playing hop scotch. We all liked to swap cards too.

My sister Pam and I were good runners and represented the school when we had interschool sports.

We had our chores at home like helping to set the fire and vacuuming. I remember all the sheets would be washed in the copper on Mondays and hung out on two long clothes lines on the block of land next to our house. The lines were held up with two wooden props.

We had fruit trees and passion fruit vines on that block as well as a cubby house and Mum had a fernery and a chook pen.

In the back yard Dad made a pond and he loved feeding his gold fish.

Mum was a good cook and I can remember how we loved her roasts, sponge cakes and scones.

She once mixed fish in with my vegetables and I didn’t like the taste of it and never ate fish again. I loved fishing but wouldn’t eat fish.

Mushrooming was one of our favourite activities and we’d walk as far as the Distillery collecting them in the paddocks. When we got home Mum would cook them and we’d have them on toast.

We had an old Ford truck we called “Lizzie” and Mum drove it because Dad’s eyesight was not good. We went out to Maude and Morrisons to go rabbiting, mushrooming and collecting firewood for our open fire. We’d also go gold panning over towards Stieglitz.

I remember going to Lorne on the Trans Otway bus with the family when I was about 11. It was a tiring day.

We mainly went out to Sutherland’s Creek to stay with Mum’s parents, Jane and Rheine Schefferle. We’d ride our bikes up Cox Road and then up over the Monastery Hill to their home

They lived on a big hill with a creek not far away. We sometimes caught eels there and went swimming but one day I was bitten on the neck by a spider there and had to have a poultice on the bite so I wasn’t too keen on going to the creek after that.

We rode our bikes that way too to Auntie Isabel’s home at Darriwell.

Councillor Hope lived nearby on a farm with fruit trees. We helped to bag onions there. There is the D.W.Hope Centre named after him near the Norlane Hotel. Another job I liked was peapicking.

Amongst my happiest memories are riding my bike down to the Freezer wharf taking Dad’s breakfast to him and seeing the big schnapper he’d caught.

Dad stayed all night at the wharf and would drop off to sleep but would jump up as soon as a fish bit.

Another thing we enjoyed as kids was poking about in the Ford tip finding bits of “treasure”.

I remember on Saturdays Mum coming home from town with Boston buns and pies from the Bon Accord delicatessen in Moorabool Street.

I remember one painful day when Mum drove me in “Lizzie” to Dr Carter’s in Drumcondra after I’d squashed my fingers in the hurdy gurdy at the North Shore playground above the beach. He put stitches in the cuts and I still have the scars.

After North Shore State I went to Matthew Flinders for three years. I loved cooking with the cookery teacher Miss Vickers. I made friends there with Wendy Hinson, Betty Tingate and Dot Mitchell.

As a teenager I started playing softball for North Shore and I still have the first trophy that I won.

Our colours were purple blouse and grey shorts.

I played with Della Evans, Helen and Rae Allthorpe, Marj Thompson, Val Power, Shirley Hole, Joyce Lawrie and my sisters Pam and May. Our home matches were in the paddock behind Bliss’s house and I can also remember playing in the Eastern Gardens.

I started work at Goodchild Shoes in Malop Street when I was 14 or 15.

My job was to inspect and clean the newly manufactured shoes. I then wrapped them in tissue and put them in cardboard boxes.

There were a lot of people working there, most of them women and girls doing separate stages of the work on what we called the ‘track’ which was a moving conveyer belt carrying along the shoes.

It was a very noisy place and smelly too because of the lacquers that were used.

I became good friends with Brian Biviano who was a ‘clicker’, that is, a worker who cuts out the pieces of leather used in making the shoes.

My teenage friends away from work were Heather Anderson, Jacki Wilson, Janet Hurst and Ron Sudden who still plays the piano and sings around the clubs in Geelong. Jacki Wilson’s parents owned the North Shore store.

I enjoyed playing softball and going to the pictures at the Regent and Corio theatres.

My friendship with Brian deepened and we were married on 7 April 1956 at St Peter and Paul’s in Mercer Street so have been married now (2012) for 56 years.

We have five children – two boys and three girls including twins.

They all went to school at Our Lady’s in Minerva Road and later the girls went to Clonard and the boys to West Tech.

Our children enjoyed playing sport. The boys played football with Newtown and Chilwell and the girls played tennis at Manifold Heights.

Our eldest, Peter, is now a taxi driver.

Daryl is the manager of Sire’s Mens Wear in Geelong. He is married to Leanne and they have

Rayne and Carly.

Debra and Angela work at Pathology Care in Geelong.

Deb’s children are Melissa and Rachael.

Angela is married to Tim and their children are

Sarah, Kate and Laura.

Christine is a secretary at LBW Accountants.

Her children are Andrew and Zoe.

Angela and Christine are the twins.

I play mid week bowls for Geelong Cement Bowls Club and have won the Club Championship six times. I am starting to slow down now and I’m letting the new ones take over. However I still play Indoor Bowls and have been winter comp champion five times and have won lots of other trophies

Jackie McLaren (nee Evans) was at our club but left to go to West Geelong. Jackie is a coach and also a bowls association district councillor.

Jackie was married on 7 April – the same date as our wedding – but six years after us.

Brian and I keep busy helping out the children and their families.

Our great delight recently was to welcome our first great grandchild, Arlee Michael, this year.








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